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How We Divide Taiwan

Small in size though Taiwan may be, the island is incredibly diverse when it comes to culture, flavors and experiences offered.   Taiwan is even pretty diverse when it comes to weather. it’s not at all uncommon to hop on the High Speed Rail on a rainy day in Taipei and disembark in Tainan 90 minutes later under sunny skies. This very rarely happens to folks taking the Amtrak from Seattle to Portland, despite the two cities being roughly the same distance from one another as Taipei and Tainan. (We had way too much fun seeing how Taiwan sizes up to other countries and various American states on The True Size website!) So while geographically petite (as countries go, though many are way smaller), Taiwan punches above its weight class in pretty much every other category. A few months back, a fun little map called “9 ways to divide Taiwan”…

A brief guide to shopping (and bargaining) in Taipei

If Taiwan had a national pastime, shopping would be it. To say that our cities are filled with shopping districts is an understatement. In some parts of Taipei, for example, it’s impossible to state with any real certainty where one particular shopping district ends and the next one begins. This isn’t to say that there aren’t districts that are better known for some items than others. For example, if you’re looking for high tech stuff, the Guanghua Digital Plaza Computer Market (光華數位新天地, or光華商場 for short) is probably your best bet. Laptops, mobile phones, cameras…If you can’t find it in the main Guanghua mall (or one of the many individual stores or underground warren-like malls in the neighborhood), chances are good the item in question either hasn’t been invented or is completely obsolete. Perry Chua(@beefperryaki)分享的貼文 於 2015 年 9月 月 12 3:48上午 PDT 張貼 Of course, no serious camerahound would…

Dressing for the weather in Taiwan

It’s been said that Taiwan has two seasons: Wet, hot summers and cool, damp winters. This, of course, is an oversimplification that fails to take into account the difference between northern and southern Taiwan, our fair island’s many micro-climates, a deceptively charming sounding plum rain season, a spot-on sounding typhoon season, global climate change, and other factors beyond the scope of this humble article designed to help you pack for your upcoming Taiwan visit. So let’s keep it simple, starting with a few basic and usually reliable generalities about Taiwan’s climate: The cooler months usually begin around November and last until March. The warmer months begin in April and last until around October. Peak heat comes in July and August, and can get very hot (especially with humidity factored in). The further south you go, the more likely it is to be warm even during the cool months. The closer…