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10 reasons to visit Xiao Liuqiu, Taiwan’s Hidden Island Gem

Located off the coast of Southern Taiwan’s Pingtung county, Xiao Liuqiu (also known as Little Okinawa) exists in that perfect mid-point of “known to locals” and “largely overlooked by international travelers.” Unlike well-trammeled Taiwan scenic spots like Sun Moon Lake, Taroko Gorge and Alishan, Xiao Liuqiu hasn’t gotten much international press. Indeed, outside of a few intrepid international travelers who find their way to the island, most westerner visitors to Xiao Liuqiu are local expats who’d likely prefer that the island remain a secret. ( Xiao Liuqiu Island 3- Day Free & Easy Package) To the aforementioned group, apologies: Awesome destinations never stay secret for long, so take solace in having found the place first. For everyone else, it’s time to let the cat out of the bag (so to speak). Here are 10 reasons to visit Taiwan’s (mostly) hidden Island Gem. 1. Xiao Liuqiu easy to reach… Liuqiu is by…

15 suggestions for a day in Dadaocheng

If strolling through scenic history-drenched streets filled with cultural attractions, unique shopping venues and an abundance of great food is your thing, Taipei’s Dadaocheng neighborhood is well worth a visit. The neighborhood just north of Taipei’s Bei Men , or north gate station become increasingly popular with travelers over the past few years (much to the bemusement of locals, who’ve been hanging out here since the late Qing dynasty). While we haven’t been coming here that long, we do remember the days when the sight of a western tourist was enough to turn a head or two, which gives us an interesting perspective on the area. Here then is a 15-point primer designed to help you make the most of your own experience in Dadaocheng: 1. Do your sightseeing from North to South The further south you go in the neighborhood, the more crowded things get, with the epicenter of…

Pingtung: Expect the Unexpected (Part two of two)

If you haven’t read part one yet,  read that first. Kenting’s position at the tapered tip of Taiwan island means that unlike most elsewhere in Taiwan (where getting lost might lead to a quick life ending or lengthy life changing experience), this far south most sensible hikers should be able to find their way within sight distance of either the Taiwan Strait or the Pacific Ocean within a few hours of hiking in any direction but due north. Once we’d left the cars behind, Misalu’s choice of footwear made perfect sense, as we found ourselves walking through a high plain grassland, dry in some places and muddy in others. “We will not walk too far,” Misalu said. “Only to the edge of Taiwan, that’s all!” We hiked along the windswept grassland that could have passed for the Scottish Highlands, save perhaps for the large patches of tropical jungle plants with…

Guanyin, Snakes & History’s Ghosts: An Afternoon on Turtle Island

All photos credit to Stephanie Huffman and Candace Chen Though the form for which the island is named is readily apparent from angles further north and south, from Toucheng pier due west, Turtle Island looks more slug-like than terrapin-shaped. A small and curving rock covered in green, the island – like all points on the horizon – grows larger and more distinctive as our boat draws closer. There are about sixty people on the Blue Whale, all wearing bright orange life jackets and hoping to catch a glimpse of the dolphins sometimes spotted frolicking around the island. The boat takes its time along the island’s southern end, a steep hill dotted with carved outcroppings. “Are those lookout points?”, asks Stephanie. I point to the long, faded green barrel of a cannon just sticking out of one of the outcropping. “Among other things,” I answer. As with many of Taiwan’s outer…

Jiufen and Jinguashi: Taiwan’s Golden Getaways

The story of Jiufen is in many ways a riches to rags (and back to riches, but of a different sort) tale. The small town about an hour away north of Taipei was built just outside of an active gold mine during the Japanese occupation, and it’s said that gold was plentiful during the good days. But the town is also remembered for a darker history during the later days of occupation when it was the site of a POW camp whose prisoners were made to labor under hard conditions. Go Ahead And Find It(@filmoviebelongstoyou)分享的貼文 於 2017 年 5月 月 16 8:41上午 PDT 張貼 Jiufen became associated with historical darkness of a different sort when Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao Hsien used the scenic mountain town as setting for much of the action in 1989’s “A City of Sadness”. The film focused on the then still taboo topic of Taiwan’s 228…